“Can A Patient With Three Leaking Heart Valves Still Have A Healthy Heart?” Asks Janelle

As a double heart valve surgery patient, I found Janelle’s recent question very interesting.

She wrote, “Hi Adam – Almost everything I read on the internet deals with a singular leaking heart valve.  At age 64, I was just diagnosed with three valves that are leaking: the aortic valve, the mitral valve and tricuspid valve.  I have shortness of breath and I am also lightheaded at times.  I am curious to know, what are the chances that someone with three leaking valves can still have a healthy heart?”

To get an expert opinion for Janelle, I recently discussed this topic with Doctor Patrick McCarthy, the Chief of Cardiac Surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. Here are the highlights from our discussion.

Thanks to Janelle for her question and a special thanks to Dr. Patrick McCarthy for taking the time to share his clinical experience with us during our valve clinic tour of Northwestern.

For those patients and caregivers in our community who are hearing impaired, I have provided a written transcript of this video interview below.

Keep on tickin!

P.S. Here is a written transcript of the video.

Adam: Hi, we are coming to you from Dr. Patrick McCarthy’s office at The Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute in Northwestern Memorial Hospital.  We’ve been answering your questions that came in at Heart Valve Blog.com and we have a fantastic question for Dr. McCarthy from Janelle.

She writes: Adam, Almost everything I read on the internet deals with a singular leaky heart valve.  At age 64, I was just diagnosed with three valves that are leaking: the aortic valve, the mitral valve and tricuspid valve.  I have shortness of breath and I am also lightheaded at times.  I am curious to know, what are the chances that someone with three leaking valves can still have a healthy heart? (To learn more about leaking heart valves, click here.)

Dr. Patrick M. McCarthy: So Janelle asks a very good question.  In the days when Rheumatic fever was much more common, we would see many patients that had multiple valves involved and three valve surgery is still not that uncommon.  We don’t write as much about it these days.  And she is right, it’s sort of under-reported.  But it’s still about 10% of what we do, are patients that have three valves or so. The big issue is when to operate because often times, like Janelle, patients develop symptoms but each individual valve may not be quite so severe that it would warrant surgery in and of itself. But, when you combine all three valves leaking or acting up somehow, then the patients may end up with symptoms and need surgery a little sooner than they may have otherwise with a single valve problem.

Photo Collage Of Dr. Patrick McCarthy
Dr. Patrick McCarthy – Chief, Division of Cardiac Surgery
Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute, Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Patrick McCarthy, MD: So it is an interesting question and Adam thanks for bringing this up to the attention of the patients.  I am sure they are really learning a lot from this and we appreciate having you visit us here at Northwestern and the Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute.

Diagram Of Top View Of The Four Heart Valves

Adam: Dr. McCarthy on behalf of all of the patients and the caregivers in our community, I just want to thank you for taking the time to speak with us today and continuing all of the great clinical work that you are doing with your patients.  I know a lot of the members of our community have been to you for surgery and have had fantastic results and on behalf of all of us again, I just want to thank you.

Adam Pick
Written by Adam Pick

Adam Pick is a patient, author of The Patient's Guide To Heart Valve Surgery and the founder of HeartValveSurgery.com.

To learn how Adam has helped millions of people with heart valve disease, watch Adam's video, subscribe to his free newsletter, or visit his Facebook, or Twitter pages.

  • ANNIE BICE

    Adam

    Thank you so much for the work you are doing…I have been told I will need repair or replacement of three valves, but the real issue is high pressures in the lungs which I am told makes the surgery extremely risky. I am 64 years old, a woman who had rheumatic fever at age 10 which adversely affected my valves. I am on diuretics at the present which have reduced significantly my shortness of breath. This scenario apparently is not a simple situation. Can you help me?

  • Lorina McElroy

    Adam,

    I am a 38 year old woman with a singular leaky valve. I was told that the only way to repair a leaky heart valve is through surgery, but at the moment my leakage is not severe enough to require surgery. What I would like to know is there anything that I can do to change my heart valve leakage from moderate to minor? Is there any type of medication that can be taken which will assist in the repair of the heart valve leakage?

  • http://www.heart-valve-surgery.com/about-adam-pick-author-heart-valve.php Adam Pick

    Hi Lorina,

    Thanks for posting your question. I am thinking the attached link might help you.

    http://www.heart-valve-surgery.com/heart-surgery-blog/2009/07/06/medication-treat-cure-heart-valve-disease/

    Keep on tickin!
    Adam

Have A Question? Call Us at (888) 725-4311

HeartValveSurgery.com
P.O. Box 4049
Redondo Beach, CA 90277
Phone: (888) 725-4311